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Teaching

I teach a variety of classes in the Program in Earth Systems, the Department of Earth System Science, and the Program in Human Biology.

Life history theory is the branch of evolutionary biology that attempts to understand patterns of investment in growth, reproduction, and survival across the life cycle. It is the theory that explains the major transitions that mark individual organisms' life cycles from conception to death.

Shripad Tuljapurkar and I organized summer workshops way back in the day. I've collected some of my lecture notes here. They're old now, but mostly still relevant.

 

Humans, broadly construed, emerged as bipedal apes in the African mixed savanna-woodlands approximately two million years ago. From humble beginnings, humans have gone on to be become the ecologically dominant species in most biomes and grown to a global population in excess of seven billion.

This course introduces the analysis of social and biological networks with a focus on field data collected by interdisciplinary environmental and health scientists.

This is a lecture course on the changing epidemiological environment, with particular attention to the ways in which anthropogenic environmental changes are altering the ecology of infectious disease transmission, thereby promoting their re-emergence as a public health threat.

Life history theory is the branch of evolutionary biology that attempts to understand patterns of investment in growth, reproduction, and survival across the life cycle. It is the theory that explains the major transitions that mark individual organisms' life cycles from conception to death.